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Open Source Operating Systems BSD

OpenBSD 5.7 Released 80

An anonymous reader writes: Right on schedule, OpenBSD 5.7 was released today, May 1, 2015. The theme of the 5.7 release is "Source Fish." There are some big changes in OpenBSD 5.7. The nginx httpd server was removed from base in favor of an internally developed httpd server in 5.7. BIND (named) was retired from base in 5.7 in favor of nsd(8) (authoritative DNS) and unbound(8) (recursive resolver). Packages will exist for BIND and nginx. This version includes a new control utility, rcctl(8), for managing daemons/services, USB 3 support and more. See a detailed log of changes between the 5.6 and 5.7 releases for more information. If you already have an OpenBSD 5.6 system, and do not want to reinstall, upgrade instructions and advice can be found in the Upgrade Guide. You can order the 5.7 CD set from the new OpenBSD Store and support the project.
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OpenBSD 5.7 Released

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  • by nult ( 3522097 )
    Looking forward to upgrading ! I think the rcctl is a great new addition to the OS.
  • by Etcetera ( 14711 ) on Friday May 01, 2015 @12:39PM (#49594457) Homepage

    No systemd ;)

    Seriously, though. Although I can't see myself switching wholesale back to BSD, and the long term *nix-esque commodity (non-specialized) ecosystem will revolve around Linux for the foreseeable future, there are enough people frustrated by the OS vendor directions that it's good to have a backup.

    Think of BSD as a third party, to keep the primary two enterprise Linux vendors in check should they decide to ignore their constitu^H^H^H^H^H^H^H users too much.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I switched from Fedora to NetBSD. Feels good knowing the OS isn't turning inside out every month. Oh yeah, I hate LVM too. For a desktop? What's wrong with a swap and a /? Nothing is wrong, never was.

      • by shoor ( 33382 )

        There was plenty of drama in the 90s around the various BSDs (FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD) before they split apart. You could go look at the old Usenet postings to see what it was like.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      BSD is a major commodity ecosystem for end-consumer products. I'd wager that there are more MacBooks and iPods out there running OSX and iOS flavors of BSD than there are Linux ones. They just suck in the server space, though, and that's where Linux cannot at the moment be questioned, let alone defeated.

      • by QuietLagoon ( 813062 ) on Friday May 01, 2015 @04:30PM (#49596257)

        BSD is a major commodity ecosystem for end-consumer products. I'd wager that there are more MacBooks and iPods out there running OSX and iOS flavors of BSD than there are Linux ones. They just suck in the server space, though, and that's where Linux cannot at the moment be questioned, let alone defeated.

        My FreeBSD servers run just fine, thank-you. I moved those servers from Linux to FreeBSD a number of years ago, and never had the need to look back.

      • by Etcetera ( 14711 )

        BSD is a major commodity ecosystem for end-consumer products. I'd wager that there are more MacBooks and iPods out there running OSX and iOS flavors of BSD than there are Linux ones. They just suck in the server space, though, and that's where Linux cannot at the moment be questioned, let alone defeated.

        Ironically, systemd is quite well suited for system designers creating embedded products, or those where there's effectively no "middle layer" between the naive "true end user" and the original builder/vendor -- a locked down iOS or an OS X system where the terminal-level control isn't needed.

        The folks most objecting to systemd are in the server space -- true OS system admins who design and integrate the architecture, and are responsible for keeping things up and running.

        Yeah, systemd+busybox might be perfe

    • Mean while ... the BSD people keep thinking of Linux as a 'third party' they'd not let their worst enemy run.

      Linux is for the unenlightened. Running a Linux file server or firewall on a heavy network ... there you're just showing how ignorant you are.

      Linux on a desktop with shitty hardware that BSD doesn't support ... sure, its great.

      • Linux on a desktop with shitty hardware that BSD doesn't support ... sure, its great.

        NetBSD runs everywhere, even shitty hardware.

        Everything on the "linux desktop" is portable stuff that runs fine on *BSD.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      hear, hear. people always are surprised when I tell them I run OpenBSD as my desktop. It's surprisingly good. I think it's the best BSD if you want current gnome support and their Python/Ruby support are also really good and current.

    • by zlogic ( 892404 )

      Probably a stupid question, but who do you consider to be the other (non-RedHat) enterprise Linux vendor?

  • Yay! (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 01, 2015 @12:53PM (#49594597)

    Nice to see these guys continually putting out good stuff. There also seems to be a Google Summer of Code to get the HAMMER2 filesystem in OpenBSD. If this happens I can definitely see swtiching our systems over to OpenBSD from Linux. We have been waiting for a real filesystem with checksumming, compression and deduplication features in OpenBSD for some time now.

  • I understand they replaced nginx with something different. But why a half-finished webserver that doesn't even support things like URL rewriting. For those who seek a secure webserver, but with features to properly support the modern website/framework/CMS, try the Hiawatha webserver [hiawatha-webserver.org].

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      nginx is still available as a port, as well as apache.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by brynet ( 3462983 )

      It's not a "half-finished" server, it's a new server written using OpenBSD's existing development practices, sharing code with relayd(8) in base. For OpenBSD httpd(8), 'featuritis' is being avoided so that the codebase remains simple and maintainable.

      https://github.com/reyk/httpd/... [github.com]

      I've never heard of Hiawatha, but the GPL licencing makes it inappropriate for the base system. It is available as a package and in the ports, along with nginx and many other servers.

  • by organgtool ( 966989 ) on Friday May 01, 2015 @03:50PM (#49595915)
    I was going to upgrade my servers to Ubuntu 15.04 until I learned that they integrated SystemD into that release, so now is a great time to evaluate OpenBSD in a virtual machine. Maybe OpenBSD could create a section on their web site that provides documentation on the advantages of BSD over Linux as well as some advice on how to avoid common pitfalls that Linux users typically make in BSD. Just for fun, they could call that section "Because of SystemD". In any event, I'm curious to see what I'll miss coming from the Linux world after spending some time in OpenBSD.

    On a semi-related note: what's with replacing nginx with their own http daemon? Is the NIH syndrome spreading to OpenBSD as well?
    • by Noryungi ( 70322 )

      [...] Maybe OpenBSD could create a section on their web site that provides documentation on the advantages of BSD over Linux as well as some advice on how to avoid common pitfalls that Linux users typically make in BSD. [...] In any event, I'm curious to see what I'll miss coming from the Linux world after spending some time in OpenBSD.
      On a semi-related note: what's with replacing nginx with their own http daemon? Is the NIH syndrome spreading to OpenBSD as well?

      Nope, they have explained at legnth that nginx was getting too big, and its developpers too unresponsive, for it to be a part of base anymore. That was also the case with the previous web server, which was an old version of Apache with a lot of patches.You can still install nginx from ports though and Apache is in there somewhere as well.

      As far as documentation is concerned, please refer to the OpenBSD FAQ:

      http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq... [openbsd.org]

      And:

      http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq... [openbsd.org]

      What will you miss? Probably not

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I would add to this there are some differences between Linux and BSD in terms of tools/command line switches for some administrative tasks, etc. I highly recommend the Absolute OpenBSD book by Michael Lucas. Great ref to have on hand when for Linux users switching over!

    • I'm curious to see what I'll miss coming from the Linux world after spending some time in OpenBSD

      You'll miss nothing. As someone who won't consider trialling an upgrade because of some program and have absolutely no idea whether it will work or not, and then will happily throw the metaphorical baby out with the bathwater and switch to a completely different OS... you won't miss a thing.

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