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Operating Systems Open Source Software Unix BSD Linux

NetBSD 7.1 Released (netbsd.org) 45

New submitter fisted writes: The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 7.1, the first feature update of the NetBSD 7 release branch. It represents a selected subset of fixes deemed important for security or stability reasons, as well as new features and enhancements. Some highlights of the 7.1 release are:

-Support for Raspberry Pi Zero.
-Initial DRM/KMS support for NVIDIA graphics cards via nouveau (Disabled by default. Uncomment nouveau and nouveaufb in your kernel config to test).
The addition of vioscsi, a driver for the Google Compute Engine disk.
-Linux compatibility improvements, allowing, e.g., the use of Adobe Flash Player 24.
-wm(4): C2000 KX and 2.5G support; Wake On Lan support; 82575 and newer SERDES based systems now work.
-ODROID-C1 Ethernet now works.
-Numerous bug fixes and stability improvements.

NetBSD is free. All of the code is under non-restrictive licenses, and may be used without paying royalties to anyone. Free support services are available via our mailing lists and website. Commercial support is available from a variety of sources. More extensive information on NetBSD is available from http://www.NetBSD.org.
You can download NetBSD 7.1 from one of these mirror sites.
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NetBSD 7.1 Released

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  • yea (Score:2, Funny)

    by Osgeld ( 1900440 )

    but does it run linux?

    • by aliquis ( 678370 )

      BSD confirms it:
      Netcraft is dead. .. or well. _I_ never use it nowadays at-least ;)

    • by Kjella ( 173770 )

      -Linux compatibility improvements, allowing, e.g., the use of Adobe Flash Player 24.

      No, but they ported the good parts. If you're into BSD(m) you must enjoy the pain.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 15, 2017 @07:05PM (#54047705)

      This renders your joke irrelevant, but NetBSD can run some Linux binaries.

      Read about it here: https://wiki.netbsd.org/guide/linux/ [netbsd.org]

      The NetBSD port for i386, amd64, mac68k, macppc, and many others can execute a great number of native Linux programs, using the Linux emulation layer. Generally, when you think about emulation you imagine something slow and inefficient because, often, emulations must reproduce hardware instructions and even architectures (usually from old machines) in software. In the case of the Linux emulation, this is radically different: it is only a thin software layer, mostly for system calls which are already very similar between the two systems. The application code itself is processed at the full speed of your CPU, so you don't get a degraded performance with the Linux emulation and the feeling is exactly the same as for native NetBSD applications.

      FreeBSD has similar functionality [freebsd.org].

      This is one of the reasons why so many former Linux users have moved to FreeBSD or NetBSD after being driven away from Linux by systemd, PulseAudio, GNOME 3, and other problematic software like that. Most Linux programs worth using compile just fine on the *BSDs, but if there are legacy, closed-source Linux applications that must be used there is at least some chance that they may work on FreeBSD or NetBSD. This makes for a very easy transition path away from Linux, or more correctly, away from systemd (it isn't the Linux kernel itself that most people have problems with, of course).

      • by paulatz ( 744216 )

        This is one of the reasons why so many former Linux users have moved to FreeBSD or NetBSD after being driven away from Linux by systemd, PulseAudio, GNOME 3, and other problematic software like that. Most Linux programs worth using compile just fine on the *BSDs, but if there are legacy, closed-source Linux applications that must be used there is at least some chance that they may work on FreeBSD or NetBSD. This makes for a very easy transition path away from Linux, or more correctly, away from systemd (it isn't the Linux kernel itself that most people have problems with, of course).

        Do you think that switching to a *BSD is easier than just installing a distribution without systemd?

        I'm not even going to comment about the obvious gnome3 fallacy

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I get the hate for systemd and pulseaudio, but Linux being "legacy"? Please. The fact is that the BSD's are fossils moving at glacial speeds, with the possible exception of DragonflyBSD. They have just about zero mind-share outside their sect-like cults, whose pathetic attempts to rewrite reality - "Linux is legacy! OSX is FreeBSD!" - does them no service, and generally speaking they are understaffed, have packaging system that are clumsy, antiquated and fragile.

        I think it's sad, because realistic alternati

        • I get your point if you were referring to NetBSD, but FreeBSD does have a bit of mindshare, even if dwarfed by Linux. It's the underpinnings of network OSs like Juniper, its NAS is widely used, it's used by pFsense, and its typically the most pioneering of the BSDs. As far as packaging system, PC-BSD/TrueOS has PBI, which takes care of library dependencies - something I'm not aware that .deb or .rpm do.

          I do agree that calling Linux legacy is out of place, and that some things, like TrueOS, have stalle

      • FreeBSD uses jails: is that what NetBSD uses? Also, does NetBSD have a way of supporting Steam?

        Also, wonder whether NetBSD borrows any concepts from Minix, such as the reincarnation server, since Minix uses NetBSD userland. Looks like NetBSD can explore microkernel approaches

        It would also be nice if NetBSD incorporated Lumina, instead of KDE and others.

    • I'm Linux user too, but I think it's great news. Linux needs competition to keep us on our toeas, so we don't get smug and lazy.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    That's nothing to brag about. All of those ethernet cards are over 10 years old.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      And they still work!

  • Over two and half decades I have used every *nix out there, both open and commercial. That is except for NetBSD. Perhaps it's time I give it a couple months attention. I have not had a serious nerd fix in awhile. Maybe I will find a good reason to put it to persistent use. Any NetBSD users out there that want to give me a heads up on the low down, I would be much obliged. If any such people wonder what I might use it for, consider anything and everything. I'm universal like that.
    • by ogdenk ( 712300 ) on Wednesday March 15, 2017 @07:49PM (#54047925)

      It's a BSD variant that will run on just about any oddball vintage hardware you have at your disposal..... 68K Macs, Atari TT's, VAX, Alpha, SPARC, UltraSPARC, sgi, DECstations, GE Microwaves, Sharp Can Openers, Compaq iPaq.

      Emphasis is on portability but performance isn't bad.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Ailicec ( 755495 )
        I found it nice for playing on SPARC32. The Linux distros have dropped sparc32, with Debian Etch being the last one I know of - if there's another I'd love to know about it. The linux kernel still supports sparc32, if you can find a distro to run it in. The NetBSD way of doing things took some adjusting, but its worth it to run modern software on some really old systems - like Sun2/3!
  • I mostly use OpenBSD as my daily driver but I've been curious about NetBSD. Maybe I'll spin up a virtual machine and play around.
    • Last time I looked OpenBSD was not a great platform to play host to a vm.

    • Well, it was a while since OpenBSD forked off NetBSD, so it would be interesting to see how much they diverged (aside from security features)
  • ...allowing, e.g., the use of Adobe Flash Player 24.

    Lol.

  • ... Some highlights of the 7.1 release are...
    -Initial DRM/KMS support for NVIDIA graphics cards...
    All of the code is under non-restrictive licenses, and may be used without paying royalties to anyone.

    That NVIDIA bit doesn't sound non-restrictive.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      it stands for Direct Rendering Manager in this case, not Digital Restrictions Management.

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