Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×
Facebook

+ - Tech Firms Fight to Keep Diversity Data Secret

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes "When it comes to diversity, corporate America sure talks the talk. Microsoft, for example, devotes an entire section of its website to spotlighting its efforts, which include scholarships, internships and recruiting initiatives. As does Google. On its jobs page, Apple also touts its commitment to diversity. But are these programs working? That's what CNN tried to find out, requesting copies of 20 top tech firms' EEO-1 forms, which categorize U.S. workers by race and gender. But the EEOC denied the request in full, saying it is legally prohibited from releasing that information. And diversity champion Microsoft declined to voluntarily release its workforce demographic data, as did sixteen other companies contacted repeatedly by CNNMoney: Apple, Amazon, Cisco, eBay, Facebook, Google, Groupon, Hewlett-Packard, Hulu, IBM, LinkedIn, LivingSocial, Netflix, Twitter, Yelp and Zynga. CNN is still waiting to hear back from the Dept. of Labor on a Freedom of Information request, but a similar request made by the San Jose Mercury in 2008 was thwarted by lawyers for Google, Apple, Yahoo, Oracle and Applied Materials, who convinced the DOL that the race and gender of their work force is a trade secret that cannot be released."
This discussion was created for logged-in users only, but now has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Tech Firms Fight to Keep Diversity Data Secret

Comments Filter:

Kiss your keyboard goodbye!

Working...